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Ethanolamine structure
Ethanolamine structure

Ethanolamine

Iupac Name:2-aminoethanol
CAS No.:141-43-5
Molecular Weight:61.08308
Introduction: Ethanolamine is a kind of viscous hygroscopic amino alcohol contains both amine and alcohol chemical groups. It is widely distributed inside the body and is a component of lecithin. It has many kinds of industrial applications. For example, it can be used in the production of agricultural chemicals including ammonia as well as the manufacturing of pharmaceuticals and detergents. It can also be used as a surfactant, fluorimetric reagent and removing agent of CO2 and H2S. In pharmaceutical field, ethanolamine is used as a Vascular Sclerosing agent. It also has antihistaminic property, which alleviates the negative symptoms caused by H1-receptor binding. View more+
1. Names and Identifiers
1.1 Name
Ethanolamine
1.2 Synonyms

1-Amino-2-butanol 1-amino-2-hydroxy-butane 1-amino-2-hydroxy-ethane 1-Amino-butan-2-ol 2-Aminoethanol 2-aminoethanol ethanolamine 2-Aminoethanol,2-Aminoethyl alcohol,ETA 2-Butanol,1-amino 2-hydroxybutylamine 2-Hydroxyethylamine amino-2-butanol aminomethylpropanol dl-1-amino-2-butanol EINECS 205-483-3 EthanoIamine ETHANOLAMINE pure Ethanolamine 2-Aminoethanol MFCD00008183 Monobutanolamine mono-sec-butanolamine NH2CH2CH2OH

1.3 CAS No.
141-43-5
1.4 CID
700
1.5 EINECS(EC#)
205-483-3
1.6 Molecular Formula
C2H7NO (isomer)
1.7 Inchi
InChI=1S/C2H7NO/c3-1-2-4/h4H,1-3H2
1.8 InChkey
HZAXFHJVJLSVMW-UHFFFAOYSA-N
1.9 Canonical Smiles
C(CO)N
1.10 Isomers Smiles
C(CO)N
2. Properties
3.1 Density
1.012
3.1 Melting point
10.3℃
3.1 Boiling point
170℃
3.1 Refractive index
1.453-1.455
3.1 Flash Point
85℃
3.1 Vapour pressure
0.458mmHg at 25°C
3.1 Precise Quality
61.05280
3.1 PSA
46.25000
3.1 logP
-0.36230
3.1 Solubility
Soluble in benzene, ether, carbon tetrachloride.
3.2 Viscosity
18.95 cP at 25 deg C; 5.03 cP at 60 deg C
3.3 VaporDensity
2.1 (vs air)
3.4 Appearance
clear liquid
3.5 Autoignition Temperature
770 °F (NTP, 1992)
3.6 Chemical Properties
Monoethanolamine is a clear, colorless or pale yellow-colored, moderately viscous liquid with a mild, ammoniacal odor. Ethanolamines can be detected by odor as low as 2-3 ppm.
3.7 Physical Properties
Monoethanolamine and triethanolamine are viscous, colorless, clear, hygroscopic liquids at room temperature; diethanolamine is a crystalline solid. All ethanolamines absorb water and carbon dioxide from the air and are infinitely miscible with water and alcohols. The freezing points of all ethanolamines can be lowered considerably by the addition of water.
3.8 Color/Form
Oil
3.9 Contact Allergens
Monoethanolamine is contained in many products,such as metalworking fluids. It is mainly an irritant.Traces may exist in other ethanolamine fluids.
3.10 Decomposition
When heated to decomposition it emits toxic fumes of /nitrogen oxides/.
3.11 Heat of Combustion
-10710 Btu/lb = -5950 cal/g = -249X10+5 J/kg
3.12 Heat of Vaporization
49.83 kJ/mol at 171 deg C
3.13 Ionization Potential
8.96 eV
3.14 Odor
Unpleasant, ammonia-like
3.15 Odor Threshold
Water odor threshold: 20000 mg/L at pKa of 9.5. Air odor threshold: 2.6 ppm. Odor Safety Class: C. C= Odor safety factor from 1-26. Less than 50% of distracted persons perceive warning of TLV. PubMed Abstract
3.16 PH
25% aqueous solution: 12.1; 0.1 N aqueous solution: 12.05
3.17 pKa
9.5(at 25℃)
3.18 Water Solubility
miscible
3.19 Spectral Properties
Index of refraction: 1.4541 at 20 degC/D
IR: 123 (Sadtler Research Laboratories Prism Collection)
UV: 2260 (Absorption Spectra in the UV and visible Regions, Academic Press, New York)
1H NMR: 9143 (Sadtler Research Laboratories Spectral Collection)
MASS: 34160 (NIST/EPA/MSDC Mass Spectral Database, 1990 version)
Raman: 1007 (Sadtler Research Laboratories Spectral Collection)
3.20 Stability
Stable. Flammable; incompatible with strong oxidizing agents, strong acids. Hygroscopic.
3.21 StorageTemp
Store at +15°C to +25°C.
3. Use and Manufacturing
4.1 Definition
ChEBI: A member of the class of ethanolamines that is ethane with an amino substituent at C-1 and a hydroxy substituent at C-2, making it both a primary amine and a primary alcohol.
4.2 Fire Hazard
Special Hazards of Combustion Products: Irritating vapors generated when heated.
4.3 History
Ethanolamines were prepared in 1860 by Wurtz from ethylene chlorohydrin and aqueous ammonia. It was only toward the end of the 19th century that an ethanolamine mixture was separated into its mono-, di-, and trieth- anolamine components; this was achieved by fractional distillation.Ethanolamines were not available commercially before the early 1930s; they assumed steadily growing commercial importance as intermediates only after 1945, because of the large-scale production of ethylene oxide. Since the mid-1970s, production of very pure, colorless triethanolamine in industrial quantities has been possible. All ethanolamines can now be obtained economically in very pure form.The most important uses of ethanolamines are in the production of emulsifiers, detergent raw materials, and textile chemicals; in gas purification processes; in cement production, as milling additives; and as building blocks for agrochemicals. Monoethanolamine is an important feedstock for the production of ethylenediamine and ethylenimine.
4.4 Potential Exposure
Monoethanolamine is widely used inindustry for scrubbing acid gases and in production ofdetergents and alkanolamide surfactants; to remove carbon dioxide and hydrogen from natural gas, to remove hydrogensulfide and carbonyl sulfide; as an alkaline conditioningagent; as an intermediate for soaps, detergents, dyes, andtextile agents. Diethanolamine is an absorbent for gases; asolubilizer for 2,4- dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D); anda softener and emulsifier intermediate for detergents. It alsofinds use in the dye and textile industry. Triethanolamine isused as plasticizers, neutralizer for alkaline dispersions;lubricant additive; corrosion inhibitor; and in the manufacture of soaps, detergents, shampoos, shaving preparations;face and hand creams; cements, cutting oils, insecticides,surface active agents; waxes, polishes, and herbicides.
4.5 Produe Method
Monoethanolamine is prepared commercially by the ammonolysisof ethylene oxide. The reaction yields a mixture of monoethanolamine,diethanolamine, and triethanolamine, which is separated toobtain the pure products. Monoethanolamine is also produced fromthe reaction between nitromethane and formaldehyde.
4.6 Safety Profile
Poison by intraperitoneal route. Moderately toxic by ingestion, skin contact, subcutaneous, intravenous, and intramuscular routes. A corrosive irritant to skin, eyes, and mucous membranes. Human mutation data reported. Flammable when exposed to heat or flame. A powerful base. Reacts violently with acetic acid, acetic anhydride, acrolein, acrylic acid, acrylonitrile, cellulose, chlorosulfonic acid, epichlorohydrin, HCl, HF, mesityl oxide, HNO3, oleum, H2SO4, p-propiolactone, vinyl acetate. To fight fire, use foam, alcohol foam, dry chemical. When heated to decomposition it emits toxic fumes of NOx. See also AMINES
4.7 Shipping
UN2491 Ethanolamine or Ethanolamine solutions, Hazard class: 8; Labels: 8-Corrosive material.
4.8 Storage
Monoethanolamine is very hygroscopic and is unstable whenexposed to light. Aqueous monoethanolamine solutions may besterilized by autoclaving. When monoethanolamine is stored in large quantities, stainlesssteel is preferable for long-term storage. Copper, copper alloys, zinc,and galvanized iron are corroded by amines and should not be usedfor construction of storage containers. Ethanolamines readilyabsorb moisture and carbon dioxide from the air; they also reactwith carbon dioxide. This can be prevented by sealing themonoethanolamine under an inert gas. Smaller quantities ofmonoethanolamine should be stored in an airtight container,protected from light, in a cool, dry place.
4.9 Usage
Ethanolamine is used as an absorption agent to remove carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide from natural gas and other gases, as a softening agent for hides, and as a dispersing agent for agricultural chemicals. Ethanolamine is also used in polishes, hair waving solutions, emulsifiers, and in the synthesis of surface-active agents (Beyer et al 1983; Mullins 1978; Windholz 1983). Ethanolamine is permitted in articles intended for use in the production, processing, or packaging of food (CFR 1981).Ethanolamine undergoes reactions characteristic of primary amines and of alcohols. Two industrially important reactions of ethanolamine involve reaction with carbon dioxide or hydrogen sulfide to yield water soluble salts, and reaction with long chain fatty acids to form neutral ethanolamine soaps (Mullins 1978). Substituted ethanolamine compounds, such as soaps, are used extensively as emulsifiers, thickeners, wetting agents, and detergents in cosmetic formulations (including skin cleaners, creams, and lotions) (Beyer et al 1983).
4.10 Waste Disposal
Controlled incineration; incinerator equipped with a scrubber or thermal unit to reducenitrogen oxides emissions
4. Safety and Handling
5.1 Symbol
GHS05;GHS07;
5.1 Hazard Codes
C
5.1 Signal Word
DANGER
5.1 Risk Statements
R20/21/22;R34
5.1 Safety Statements
S26;S36/37/39;S45
5.1 Exposure Standards and Regulations
Ethanolamine is an indirect food additive for use only as a component of adhesives.
5.2 Packing Group
III
5.2 Octanol/Water Partition Coefficient
log Kow = -1.31
5.3 Other Preventative Measures
SRP: The scientific literature for the use of contact lenses in industry is conflicting. The benefit or detrimental effects of wearing contact lenses depend not only upon the substance, but also on factors including the form of the substance, characteristics and duration of the exposure, the uses of other eye protection equipment, and the hygiene of the lenses. However, there may be individual substances whose irritating or corrosive properties are such that the wearing of contact lenses would be harmful to the eye. In those specific cases, contact lenses should not be worn. In any event, the usual eye protection equipment should be worn even when contact lenses are in place.
SRP: Local exhaust ventilation should be applied wherever there is an incidence of point source emissions or dispersion of regulated contaminants in the work area. Ventilation control of the contaminant as close to its point of generation is both the most economical and safest method to minimize personnel exposure to airborne contaminants.
The worker should immediately wash the skin when it becomes contaminated.
Work clothing that becomes wet or significantly contaminated should be removed and replaced.
Workers whose clothing may have become contaminated should change into uncontaminated clothing before leaving the work premises.
SRP: Contaminated protective clothing should be segregated in such a manner so that there is no direct personal contact by personnel who handle, dispose, or clean the clothing. Quality assurance to ascertain the completeness of the cleaning procedures should be implemented before the decontaminated protective clothing is returned for reuse by the workers. Contaminated clothing should not be taken home at end of shift, but should remain at employee's place of work for cleaning.
5.4 Hazard Class
8
5.4 Hazard Declaration
H302 + H312 + H332; H314; H335; H412
5.4 Cleanup Methods
1. Remove all ignition sources. 2. Ventilate area of spill or leak. 3. If in liquid form, for small quantities, absorb on paper towels. Evaporate in a safe place (such as a fume hood). Allow sufficient time for evaporating vapors to completely clear the hood ductwork. Burn the paper in a suitable location away from combustible materials. Large quantities can be reclaimed or collected and atomized in a suitable combustion chamber equipped with an appropriate effluent gas cleaning device. 4. If in solid form, allow to melt and follow (3) above.
5.5 DisposalMethods
SRP: The most favorable course of action is to use an alternative chemical product with less inherent propensity for occupational exposure or environmental contamination. Recycle any unused portion of the material for its approved use or return it to the manufacturer or supplier. Ultimate disposal of the chemical must consider: the material's impact on air quality; potential migration in soil or water; effects on animal, aquatic, and plant life; and conformance with environmental and public health regulations.
/SRP: For small quantities/1. By absorbing it in vermiculite, dry sand, earth or a similar material and disposing in a secured sanitary landfill. 2. By atomizing in a suitable combustion chamber equipped with an appropriate effluent gas cleaning device.
5.6 DOT Emergency Guidelines
/GUIDE 153: SUBSTANCES - TOXIC AND/OR CORROSIVE (COMBUSTIBLE)/ Health: TOXIC; inhalation, ingestion, or skin contact with material may cause severe injury or death. Contact with molten substance may cause severe burns to skin and eyes. Avoid any skin contact. Effects of contact or inhalation may be delayed. Fire may produce irritating, corrosive and/or toxic gases. Runoff from fire control or dilution water may be corrosive and/or toxic and cause pollution. /Ethanolamine; Ethanolamine, solution; Monoethanolamine/
/GUIDE 153: SUBSTANCES - TOXIC AND/OR CORROSIVE (COMBUSTIBLE)/ Fire or Explosion: Combustible material: may burn but does not ignite readily. When heated, vapors may form explosive mixtures with air: indoors, outdoors, and sewers explosion hazards. Those substances designated with a "P" may polymerize explosively when heated or involved in a fire. Contact with metals may evolve flammable hydrogen gas. Containers may explode when heated. Runoff may pollute waterways. Substance may be transported in a molten form. /Ethanolamine; Ethanolamine, solution; Monoethanolamine/
/GUIDE 153: SUBSTANCES - TOXIC AND/OR CORROSIVE (COMBUSTIBLE)/ Public Safety: CALL Emergency Response Telephone Number ... . As an immediate precautionary measure, isolate spill or leak area in all directions for at least 50 meters (150 feet) for liquids and at least 25 meters (75 feet) for solids. Keep unauthorized personnel away. Stay upwind. Keep out of low areas. Ventilate enclosed areas. /Ethanolamine; Ethanolamine, solution; Monoethanolamine/
/GUIDE 153: SUBSTANCES - TOXIC AND/OR CORROSIVE (COMBUSTIBLE)/ Protective Clothing: Wear positive pressure self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). Wear chemical protective clothing that is specifically recommended by the manufacturer. It may provide little or no thermal protection. Structural firefighters' protective clothing provides limited protection in fire situations ONLY; it is not effective in spill situations where direct contact with the substance is possible. /Ethanolamine; Ethanolamine, solution; Monoethanolamine/
/GUIDE 153: SUBSTANCES - TOXIC AND/OR CORROSIVE (COMBUSTIBLE)/ Evacuation: ... Fire: If tank, rail car or tank truck is involved in a fire, ISOLATE for 800 meters (1/2 mile) in all directions; also, consider initial evacuation for 800 meters (1/2 mile) in all directions. /Ethanolamine; Ethanolamine, solution; Monoethanolamine/
/GUIDE 153: SUBSTANCES - TOXIC AND/OR CORROSIVE (COMBUSTIBLE)/ Fire: Small fires: Dry chemical, CO2 or water spray. Large fires: Dry chemical, CO2, alcohol-resistant foam or water spray. Move containers from fire area if you can do it without risk. Dike fire control water for later disposal; do not scatter the material. Fire involving tanks or car/trailer loads: Fight fire from maximum distance or use unmanned hose holders or monitor nozzles. Do not get water inside containers. Cool containers with flooding quantities of water until well after fire is out. Withdraw immediately in case of rising sound from venting safety devices or discoloration of tank. ALWAYS stay away from tanks engulfed in fire. /Ethanolamine; Ethanolamine, solution; Monoethanolamine/
/GUIDE 153: SUBSTANCES - TOXIC AND/OR CORROSIVE (COMBUSTIBLE)/ Spill or Leak: ELIMINATE all ignition sources (no smoking, flares, sparks or flames in immediate area). Do not touch damaged containers or spilled material unless wearing appropriate protective clothing. Stop leak if you can do it without risk. Prevent entry into waterways, sewers, basements or confined areas. Absorb or cover with dry earth, sand or other non-combustible material and transfer to containers. DO NOT GET WATER INSIDE CONTAINERS. /Ethanolamine; Ethanolamine, solution; Monoethanolamine/
/GUIDE 153: SUBSTANCES - TOXIC AND/OR CORROSIVE (COMBUSTIBLE)/ First Aid: Move victim to fresh air. Call 911 or emergency medical service. Give artificial respiration if victim is not breathing. Do not use mouth-to-mouth method if victim ingested or inhaled the substance; give artificial respiration with the aid of a pocket mask equipped with a one-way valve or other proper respiratory medical device. Administer oxygen if breathing is difficult. Remove and isolate contaminated clothing and shoes. In case of contact with substance, immediately flush skin or eyes with running water for at least 20 minutes. For minor skin contact, avoid spreading material on unaffected skin. Keep victim warm and quiet. Effects of exposure (inhalation, ingestion or skin contact) to substance may be delayed. Ensure that medical personnel are aware of the material(s) involved and take precautions to protect themselves. /Ethanolamine; Ethanolamine, solution; Monoethanolamine/
5.7 RIDADR
UN 2491
5.7 Fire Fighting Procedures
Use water spray, dry chemical "alcohol resistant" foam or carbon dioxide. use water to keep fire-exposed containers cool.
Wear special protective clothing & positive pressure self-contained breathing apparatus.
5.8 FirePotential
Combustible liquid.
5.9 Caution Statement
P261; P273; P301 + P312 + P330; P303 + P361 + P353; P304 + P340 + P310; P305 + P351 + P338
5.9 Formulations/Preparations
GRADE: Technical; NF /National Formulary/
Grades or Purity: NF; 85% (15% water); commercial; 99+%
5.10 Incompatibilities
Monoethanolamine contains both a hydroxy group and a primaryamine group and will thus undergo reactions characteristic of bothalcohols and amines. Ethanolamines will react with acids to formsalts and esters. Discoloration and precipitation will take place in the presence of salts of heavy metals. Monoethanolamine reactswith acids, acid anhydrides, acid chlorides, and esters to form amidederivatives, and with propylene carbonate or other cyclic carbonatesto give the corresponding carbonates. As a primary amine, monoethanolamine will react withaldehydes and ketones to yield aldimines and ketimines. Additionally,monoethanolamine will react with aluminum, copper, andcopper alloys to form complex salts. A violent reaction will occurwith acrolein, acrylonitrile, epichlorohydrin, propiolactone, andvinyl acetate.
5.11 WGK Germany
1
5.11 RTECS
KJ5775000
5.11 Protective Equipment and Clothing
Full face shield; goggles; eye wash facility.
Wear special protective clothing & positive pressure self-contained breathing apparatus.
Wear appropriate personal protective clothing to prevent skin contact.
Wear appropriate eye protection to prevent eye contact.
Eyewash fountains should be provided in areas where there is any possibility that workers could be exposed to the substance; this is irrespective of the recommendation involving the wearing of eye protection.
Respirator Recommendations : Up to 30 ppm: (Assigned Protection Factor = 10) Any chemical cartridge respirator with cartridge(s) providing protection against the compound of concern. Substance reported to cause eye irritation or damage; may require eye protection./(Assigned Protection Factor = 50) Any air-purifying, full-facepiece respirator (gas mask) with a chin-style, front- or back-mounted canister providing protection against the compound of concern./(Assigned Protection Factor = 25) Any powered, air-purifying respirator with cartridge(s) providing protection against the compound of concern. Substance reported to cause eye irritation or damage; may require eye protection./(Assigned Protection Factor = 10) Any supplied-air respirator. Substance reported to cause eye irritation or damage; may require eye protection./(Assigned Protection Factor = 50) Any self-contained breathing apparatus with a full facepiece.
Respirator Recommendations : Emergency or planned entry into unknown concentrations or IDLH conditions: (Assigned Protection Factor = 10,000) Any self-contained breathing apparatus that has a full facepiece and is operated in a pressure-demand or other positive-pressure mode./(Assigned Protection Factor = 10,000) Any supplied-air respirator that has a full facepiece and is operated in a pressure-demand or other positive-pressure mode in combination with an auxiliary self-contained positive-pressure breathing apparatus.
Respirator Recommendations : Escape: (Assigned Protection Factor = 50) Any air-purifying, full-facepiece respirator (gas mask) with a chin-style, front- or back-mounted canister providing protection against the compound of concern/Any appropriate escape-type, self-contained breathing apparatus.
5.12 Reactivities and Incompatibilities
Strong oxidizers, strong acids, iron [Note: May attack copper, brass, and rubber].
Strong alkali. Reacts with oxidizing materials, acids, halogenated hydrocarbons to produce heat. Reacts with iron producing an unstable and pyrophoric complex trisethanolaminoiron.
Mixing acetic acid and 2-aminoethanol in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. (It was observed when equimolar quantities of 2 chemicals were mixed in a closed container. In some cases the changes were solely vapor pressure effects due to heat of solution.)
Mixing acetic anhydride and 2-aminoethanol in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. (It was observed when equimolar quantities of 2 chemicals were mixed in a closed container. In some cases the changes were solely vapor pressure effects due to heat of solution.)
Mixing acrolein and 2-aminoethanol in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. (It was observed when equimolar quantities of 2 chemicals were mixed in a closed container. In some cases the changes were solely vapor pressure effects due to heat of solution.)
Mixing acrylic acid and 2-aminoethanol in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. (It was observed when equimolar quantities of 2 chemicals were mixed in a closed container. In some cases the changes were solely vapor pressure effects due to heat of solution.)
Mixing acrylonitrile and 2-aminoethanol in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. (It was observed when equimolar quantities of 2 chemicals were mixed in a closed container. In some cases the changes were solely vapor pressure effects due to heat of solution.)
Mixing 2-aminoethanol and chlorosulfonic acid in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. (It was observed when equimolar quantities of 2 chemicals were mixed in a closed container. In some cases the changes were solely vapor pressure effects due to heat of solution.)
Mixing 2-aminoethanol and epichlorohydrin in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. (It was observed when equimolar quantities of 2 chemicals were mixed in a closed container. In some cases the changes were solely vapor pressure effects due to heat of solution.)
Mixing 2-aminoethanol and 36% hydrochloric acid in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. (It was observed when equimolar quantities of 2 chemicals were mixed in a closed container. In some cases the changes were solely vapor pressure effects due to heat of solution.)
Mixing 2-aminoethanol and 48.7% hydrofluoric acid in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. (It was observed when equimolar quantities of 2 chemicals were mixed in a closed container. In some cases the changes were solely vapor pressure effects due to heat of solution.)
Mixing 2-aminoethanol and 70% nitric acid in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. (It was observed when equimolar quantities of 2 chemicals were mixed in a closed container. In some cases the changes were solely vapor pressure effects due to heat of solution.)
Mixing mesityloxide and 2-aminoethanol in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. (It was observed when equimolar quantities of 2 chemicals were mixed in a closed container. In some cases the changes were solely vapor pressure effects due to heat of solution.)
Mixing 2-aminoethanol and oleum in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. (It was observed when equimolar quantities of 2 chemicals were mixed in a closed container. In some cases the changes were solely vapor pressure effects due to heat of solution.)
Mixing 2-aminoethanol and propiolactone (BETA-) in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. (It was observed when equimolar quantities of 2 chemicals were mixed in a closed container. In some cases the changes were solely vapor pressure effects due to heat of solution.)
Mixing 2-aminoethanol and 96% sulfuric acid in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. (It was observed when equimolar quantities of 2 chemicals were mixed in a closed container. In some cases the changes were solely vapor pressure effects due to heat of solution.)
Mixing 2-aminoethanol and vinyl acetate in a closed container caused the temperature and pressure to increase. (It was observed when equimolar quantities of 2 chemicals were mixed in a closed container. In some cases the changes were solely vapor pressure effects due to heat of solution.)
5.13 Skin, Eye, and Respiratory Irritations
Irritating to skin, eyes, respiratory system.
5.14 Safety

Hazard Codes:?ToxicT?CorrosiveC??
Risk Statements: 20/21/22-34-39/23/24/25-23/24/25-10
R20/21/22: Harmful by inhalation, in contact with skin and if swallowed.?
R34: Causes burns.?
R23/24/25: Toxic by inhalation, in contact with skin and if swallowed.?
R10: Flammable.
Safety Statements: 26-36/37/39-45
S26: In case of contact with eyes, rinse immediately with plenty of water and seek medical advice.?
S36/37/39: Wear suitable protective clothing, gloves and eye/face protection.?
S45: In case of accident or if you feel unwell, seek medical advice immediately (show the label whenever possible.)
RIDADR: UN 2924 3/PG 3
WGK Germany: 1
RTECS: KJ5775000
F: 8-10-23
HazardClass: 8
PackingGroup: III

5.15 Sensitive
Air Sensitive & Hygroscopic
5.16 Specification

? Ethanolamine , with CAS number of 141-43-5, can be called 1-Amino-2-hydroxyethane ; 2-Amino-1-ethanol ; 2-Aminoaethanol ; EPA Pesticide Chemical Code 011601 ; Glycinol (monoethanolamine) ; Monoaethanolamin ; Monoethanolamine .?It can be used in organic synthesis.The extinguishing agent of?Ethanolamine (CAS NO.141-43-5) are dry powder, foam, sand, carbon dioxide, water mist.

5.17 Toxicity

1. ???

ratLD50:1500mg/kg

??? Gigiena Truda i Professional'nye Zabolevaniya. Labor Hygiene and Occupational Diseases. Vol. 23(9), Pg. 55, 1979.
2. ???

ratLD50:1720mg/kg

??? Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology. Vol. 42, Pg. 417, 1977.
3. ???

rabbitLD50:1mL/kg

??? Union Carbide Data Sheet. Vol. 1/13/1972,
4. ???

mouseLD50:700mg/kg

??? Toksikologiya Novykh Promyshlennykh Khimicheskikh Veshchestv. Toxicology of New Industrial Chemical Substances. For English translation, see TNICS*. Vol. 4, Pg. 81, 1962.

5. MSDS

2.Hazard identification

2.1 Classification of the substance or mixture

Acute toxicity - Oral, Category 4

Acute toxicity - Dermal, Category 4

Skin corrosion, Category 1B

Acute toxicity - Inhalation, Category 4

2.2 GHS label elements, including precautionary statements

Pictogram(s)
Signal word

Danger

Hazard statement(s)

H302 Harmful if swallowed

H312 Harmful in contact with skin

H314 Causes severe skin burns and eye damage

H332 Harmful if inhaled

Precautionary statement(s)
Prevention

P264 Wash ... thoroughly after handling.

P270 Do not eat, drink or smoke when using this product.

P280 Wear protective gloves/protective clothing/eye protection/face protection.

P260 Do not breathe dust/fume/gas/mist/vapours/spray.

P261 Avoid breathing dust/fume/gas/mist/vapours/spray.

P271 Use only outdoors or in a well-ventilated area.

Response

P301+P312 IF SWALLOWED: Call a POISON CENTER/doctor/\u2026if you feel unwell.

P330 Rinse mouth.

P302+P352 IF ON SKIN: Wash with plenty of water/...

P312 Call a POISON CENTER/doctor/\u2026if you feel unwell.

P321 Specific treatment (see ... on this label).

P362+P364 Take off contaminated clothing and wash it before reuse.

P301+P330+P331 IF SWALLOWED: Rinse mouth. Do NOT induce vomiting.

P303+P361+P353 IF ON SKIN (or hair): Take off immediately all contaminated clothing. Rinse skin with water [or shower].

P363 Wash contaminated clothing before reuse.

P304+P340 IF INHALED: Remove person to fresh air and keep comfortable for breathing.

P310 Immediately call a POISON CENTER/doctor/\u2026

P305+P351+P338 IF IN EYES: Rinse cautiously with water for several minutes. Remove contact lenses, if present and easy to do. Continue rinsing.

Storage

P405 Store locked up.

Disposal

P501 Dispose of contents/container to ...

2.3 Other hazards which do not result in classification

none

9. Other Information
9.0 Merck
14,3727
9.1 BRN
505944
9.2 Description
Ethanolamine is a kind of viscous hygroscopic amino alcohol contains both amine and alcohol chemical groups. It is widely distributed inside the body and is a component of lecithin. It has many kinds of industrial applications. For example, it can be used in the production of agricultural chemicals including ammonia as well as the manufacturing of pharmaceuticals and detergents. It can also be used as a surfactant, fluorimetric reagent and removing agent of CO2 and H2S. In pharmaceutical field, ethanolamine is used as a Vascular Sclerosing agent. It also has antihistaminic property, which alleviates the negative symptoms caused by H1-receptor binding.
9.3 Physical properties
Monoethanolamine and triethanolamine are viscous, colorless, clear, hygroscopic liquids at room temperature; diethanolamine is a crystalline solid. All ethanolamines absorb water and carbon dioxide from the air and are infinitely miscible with water and alcohols. The freezing points of all ethanolamines can be lowered considerably by the addition of water.
Ethanolamine
Ethanolamines are used widely as intermediates in the production of surfactants, which have become commercially important as detergents, textile and leather chemicals, and emulsifiers. Their uses range from drilling and cutting oils to medicinal soaps and highquality toiletries.
9.4 History
Ethanolamines were prepared in 1860 by Wurtz from ethylene chlorohydrin and aqueous ammonia. It was only toward the end of the 19th century that an ethanolamine mixture was separated into its mono-, di-, and trieth- anolamine components; this was achieved by fractional distillation.
Ethanolamines were not available commercially before the early 1930s; they assumed steadily growing commercial importance as intermediates only after 1945, because of the large-scale production of ethylene oxide. Since the mid-1970s, production of very pure, colorless triethanolamine in industrial quantities has been possible. All ethanolamines can now be obtained economically in very pure form.
The most important uses of ethanolamines are in the production of emulsifiers, detergent raw materials, and textile chemicals; in gas purification processes; in cement production, as milling additives; and as building blocks for agrochemicals. Monoethanolamine is an important feedstock for the production of ethylenediamine and ethylenimine.
9.5 Uses
Ethanolamine is used as an absorption agent to remove carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide from natural gas and other gases, as a softening agent for hides, and as a dispersing agent for agricultural chemicals. Ethanolamine is also used in polishes, hair waving solutions, emulsifiers, and in the synthesis of surface-active agents (Beyer et al 1983; Mullins 1978; Windholz 1983). Ethanolamine is permitted in articles intended for use in the production, processing, or packaging of food (CFR 1981).
Ethanolamine undergoes reactions characteristic of primary amines and of alcohols. Two industrially important reactions of ethanolamine involve reaction with carbon dioxide or hydrogen sulfide to yield water soluble salts, and reaction with long chain fatty acids to form neutral ethanolamine soaps (Mullins 1978). Substituted ethanolamine compounds, such as soaps, are used extensively as emulsifiers, thickeners, wetting agents, and detergents in cosmetic formulations (including skin cleaners, creams, and lotions) (Beyer et al 1983).
9.6 Preparation
Ethanolamine is produced with diethanolamine and triethanolamine by ammonolysis of ethylene oxide; ethanolamine is then separated by distillation (Mullins 1978).
9.7 Occupational Health
Monoethanolamine is the most strongly basic material in this family and also has the highest vapor pressure. Breathing vapors can be irritating to the respiratory tract. Eye or skin contact can result in serious chemical burns. Diethanolamine is not as serious a hazard as Monoethanolamine, and Triethanolamine is even less so. Work practices should include adequate workplace ventilation to eliminate irritating vapors and proper protective equipment to prevent skin contact with these chemicals. Cover-all eye goggles should be worn whenever there is a chance material may be splashed into the eyes. Contaminated work clothes must not be taken home.If they are reusable, they should be laundered separately and stored in separate lockers from street clothing.
9.8 References
http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-ethanolamine.htm
https://pubchem.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/compound/Ethanolamine#section=Top
9.9 Description
Monoethanolamine is contained in many products, such as metalwork fluids. It is mainly an irritant. Traces may exist in other ethanolamine fluids.
9.10 Chemical Properties
Monoethanolamine is a clear, colorless or pale yellow-colored, moderately viscous liquid with a mild, ammoniacal odor. Ethanolamines can be detected by odor as low as 2-3 ppm.
9.11 Physical properties
Colorless, viscous, hygroscopic liquid with an unpleasant, mild, ammonia-like odor. Odor threshold concentration is 2.6 ppm (quoted, Amoore and Hautala, 1983). The lowest taste threshold concentration in potable water at 40 °C was 2.4 mg/L (Alexander et al., 1982).
9.12 Uses
Monoethanolamine is used as a dispersing agent for agricultural chemicals, in thesynthesis of surface-active agents, as a softening agent for hides, and in emulsifiers,polishes, and hair solutions.
9.13 Uses
As a chemical intermediate; corrosion inhibitor; in the production of cosmetics, detergents, paints, and polishes
9.14 Uses
Used as buffer; removal of carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide from gas mixtures.
9.15 Definition
ChEBI: A member of the class of ethanolamines that is ethane with an amino substituent at C-1 and a hydroxy substituent at C-2, making it both a primary amine and a primary alcohol.
9.16 Production Methods
Monoethanolamine is prepared commercially by the ammonolysis of ethylene oxide. The reaction yields a mixture of monoethanolamine, diethanolamine, and triethanolamine, which is separated to obtain the pure products. Monoethanolamine is also produced from the reaction between nitromethane and formaldehyde.
9.17 Definition
ethanolamine: Any of three lowmeltinghygroscopic colourlesssolids. They are strong bases, smell ofammonia, and absorb water readilyto form viscous liquids. Monoethanolamine,HOCH2CH2NH2, is aprimary amine, m.p. 10.5°C; diethanolamine,(HOCH2CH2)2NH, is asecondary amine, m.p. 28°C; and triethanolamine,(HOCH2CH2)3N, is atertiary amine, m.p. 21°C. All aremade by heating ethylene oxide withconcentrated aqueous ammoniaunder pressure and separating theproducts by fractional distillation.With fatty acids they form neutralsoaps, used as emulsifying agentsand detergents, and in bactericidesand cosmetics.
9.18 General Description
A clear colorless liquid with an odor resembling that of ammonia. Flash point 185°F. May attack copper, brass, and rubber. Corrosive to tissue. Moderately toxic. Produces toxic oxides of nitrogen during combustion.
9.19 Air & Water Reactions
Water soluble with evolution of heat.
9.20 Reactivity Profile
Ethanolamine is a base. Reacts with organic acids (acetic acid, acrylic acid), inorganic acids (hydrochloric acid, hydrofluoric acid, nitric acid, sulfuric acid, chlorosulfonic acid), acetic anhydride, acrolein, acrylonitrile, cellulose, epichlorohydrin, mesityl oxide, beta-propiolactone, vinyl acetate. Emits toxic fumes of nitrogen oxides when heated to decomposition [Sax, 9th ed., 1996, p. 1498].
9.21 Health Hazard
Monoethanolamine causes severe irritationof the eyes and mild to moderate irritationof the skin. The pure liquid caused rednessand swelling when applied to rabbits’ skin.The acute oral toxicity of this compound waslow in animals. The toxic symptoms includedsomnolence, lethargy, muscle contraction,and respiratory distress. The oral LD50 valuesshowed a wide variation with species.
LD50 value, oral (rabbits): 1000 mg/kg
Monoethanolamine showed reproductive tox icity when administered at a dose of850 mg/kg/day, causing 16% mortality topregnant animals (Environmental HealthResearch and Testing 1987). This study alsoindicated that monoethanolamine reduced thenumber of viable litters but had no effect onlitter size, the birth weight, or percentage sur vival of the pups.
9.22 Fire Hazard
Special Hazards of Combustion Products: Irritating vapors generated when heated.
9.23 Pharmaceutical Applications
Monoethanolamine is used primarily in pharmaceutical formulations for buffering purposes and in the preparation of emulsions. Other uses include as a solvent for fats and oils and as a stabilizing agent in an injectable dextrose solution of phenytoin sodium.
Monoethanolamine is also used to produce a variety of salts with therapeutic uses. For example, a salt of monoethanolamine with vitamin C is used for intramuscular injection, while the salicylate and undecenoate monoethanolamine salts are utilized respectively in the treatment of rheumatism and as an antifungal agent. However, the most common therapeutic use of monoethanolamine is in the production of ethanolamine oleate injection, which is used as a sclerosing agent.
9.24 Contact allergens
Monoethanolamine is contained in many products, such as metalworking fluids. It is mainly an irritant. Traces may exist in other ethanolamine fluids.
9.25 Safety Profile
Poison by intraperitoneal route. Moderately toxic by ingestion, skin contact, subcutaneous, intravenous, and intramuscular routes. A corrosive irritant to skin, eyes, and mucous membranes. Human mutation data reported. Flammable when exposed to heat or flame. A powerful base. Reacts violently with acetic acid, acetic anhydride, acrolein, acrylic acid, acrylonitrile, cellulose, chlorosulfonic acid, epichlorohydrin, HCl, HF, mesityl oxide, HNO3, oleum, H2SO4, p-propiolactone, vinyl acetate. To fight fire, use foam, alcohol foam, dry chemical. When heated to decomposition it emits toxic fumes of NOx. See also AMINES
9.26 Safety
Monoethanolamine is an irritant, caustic material, but when it is used in neutralized parenteral and topical pharmaceutical formulations it is not usually associated with adverse effects, although hypersensitivity reactions have been reported. Monoethanolamine salts are generally regarded as being less toxic than monoethanolamine.
LD50 (mouse, IP): 0.05 g/kg
LD50 (mouse, oral): 0.7 g/kg
LD50 (rabbit, skin): 1.0 g/kg
LD50 (rat, IM): 1.75 g/kg
LD50 (rat, IP): 0.07 g/kg
LD50 (rat, IV): 0.23 g/kg
LD50 (rat, oral): 1.72 g/kg
LD50 (rat, SC): 1.5 g/kg
9.27 Potential Exposure
Monoethanolamine is widely used in industry for scrubbing acid gases and in production of detergents and alkanolamide surfactants; to remove carbon dioxide and hydrogen from natural gas, to remove hydrogen sulfide and carbonyl sulfide; as an alkaline conditioning agent; as an intermediate for soaps, detergents, dyes, and textile agents. Diethanolamine is an absorbent for gases; a solubilizer for 2,4- dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D); and a softener and emulsifier intermediate for detergents. It also finds use in the dye and textile industry. Triethanolamine is used as plasticizers, neutralizer for alkaline dispersions; lubricant additive; corrosion inhibitor; and in the manufacture of soaps, detergents, shampoos, shaving preparations; face and hand creams; cements, cutting oils, insecticides, surface active agents; waxes, polishes, and herbicides.
9.28 Environmental fate
Biological. Bridié et al. (1979) reported BOD and COD values of 0.93 and 1.28 g/g using filtered effluent from a biological sanitary waste treatment plant. These values were determined using a standard dilution method at 20 °C for a period of 5 d. Similarly, Heukelekian and Rand (1955) reported a 5-d BOD value of 0.85 g/g which is 65.0% of the ThOD value of 1.31 g/g.
Chemical/Physical. Aqueous chlorination of ethanolamine at high pH produced Nchloroethanolamine, which slowly degraded to unidentified products (Antelo et al., 1981).
At an influent concentration of 1,012 mg/L, treatment with GAC resulted in an effluent concentration of 939 mg/L. The adsorbability of the carbon used was 15 mg/g carbon (Guisti et al., 1974).
9.29 Metabolism
Animal
Ethanolamine is a naturally occurring constituent in mammalian urine; the excretion rate is about 1.36 mg/kg/d for rats, 0.91 mg/kg/d for rabbits, and 0.454 mg/kg/d for cats (Luck and Wilcox 1953). It was suggested that deamination of ethanolamine occurs in vivo, since within 24 h after administration of [15N]-ethanolamine to rabbits, 40% of the [15N]-label was excreted as urea (Beard and Noe 1981). Sprinson and Weliky (1969) found that labeled ethanolamine was extensively converted to labeled acetate in rats.
Eight h after intraperitoneal injection of 0.52μmoles of [14C]-ethanolamine in Wistar rats, 11.5% of the injected dose was recovered as 14C02 (Taylor and Richardson 1967). At that time, about 50% of the injected radioactivity was found in the liver, and significant amounts (>2% [14C]/g tissue) were detected in the spleen and brain. In the liver, greater than 90% of the radioactivity was found in the lipid fraction; in the kidney, spleen and brain, the per cent in the lipid fraction was about 60, 30, and 54%, respectively. It was suggested that the main metabolic pathway for ethanolamine in rats involves its incorporation into phospholipids, presumably via exchange with serine in phosphatidylserine, resulting in the formation of phosphatidylethanolamine. The incorporation of [14C]-ethanolamine into ethanolamine phosphoglycerides in liver, heart and brain has been extensively studied and is thought to occur via the CDP-ethanolamine pathway or by a base exchange reaction (Ansell and Spanner 1967; Weinhold and Sanders 1971; Zelinski and Choy 1982).
Fifty h after topical application of [14C]-ethanolamine to excised pig skin in vitro (4μg/cm2), greater than 60% of the applied dose was found associated with the skin (Klain et al 1985). Twenty-four h after dermal application of [14C]- ethanolamine to athymic nude mice (4μg to 1.45 cm2), 19% of the applied dose was recovered in expired C02; this value was similar to that obtained after ip injection of ethanolamine. Radioactivity from [14C]ethanolamine was widely distributed in the body, with the highest levels found in the liver (26%) and kidneys (2.2%). Radioactivity was observed in hepatic phospholipids as the ethanolamine, serine, and choline bases, and in proteins and amino acids isolated from liver and skin sections. Urinary excretion included radioactive ethanolamine, urea, glycine, serine, uric acid, and choline. Thus, ethanolamine penetrates mouse skin and may be oxidized to C02, incorporated into hepatic phospholipids, or metabolized to amino acids.
Twenty-four h after administration of [14C]-ethanolamine to dogs, total radioactivity in the blood was 1.69% of the administered dse (Rhodes and Case 1977). Eleven % of the dose was excreted in the urine. The half-life of the persistent low level of radioactivity in the blood was 19 d.
Human
Ethanolamine is a naturally occurring constituent in human urine, with a mean excretion rate in males of 0.162 mg/kg/d and in females of 0.491 mg/kg/d (Luck and Wilcox 1953). [14C]-ethanolamine was topically applied to human skin grafted onto athymic nude mice at a dose of 4μg to a 1.45 cm2 graft area (Klain et al 1985). The rate and amount of radioactivity expired as 14C02 was similar to that described above for mice. Thus, the penetration rates of ethanolamine in human skin grafts and mouse skin appear to be similar.
9.30 形态
Liquid
9.31 Usage
Ethanolamine is also used in messenger molecules such as palmitoylethanolamide, which have an effect on CB1 receptors. Ethanolamine is used as a scrubber for the removal of methyl bromide. Polyaniline doping ethanolamine is used for modified electrode preparation to measure uric acid in human body with the presence of antiscorbutic acid.
9.32 Usage
It is also used in messenger molecules such as palmitoylethanolamide, which have an effect on CB1 receptors. Ethanolamine is used as a scrubber for the removal of methyl bromide. Polyaniline doping ethanolamine is used for modified electrode preparation to measure uric acid in human body with the presence of antiscorbutic acid.
9.33 Usage
Ethanolamine is used as a surfactant, fluorimetric reagent, and to remove CO2 and H2S from natural gas and other gases, functional fluids, intermediates. It is also used as feedstock in the production of detergents, emulsifiers, polishes, pharmaceuticals, corrosion inhibitors, chemical intermediates, ion exchange agents, plating agents and surface treating agents, electrical and electronic products, paper products, personal care products.
9.34 storage
Monoethanolamine is very hygroscopic and is unstable when exposed to light. Aqueous monoethanolamine solutions may be sterilized by autoclaving.
When monoethanolamine is stored in large quantities, stainless steel is preferable for long-term storage. Copper, copper alloys, zinc, and galvanized iron are corroded by amines and should not be used for construction of storage containers. Ethanolamines readily absorb moisture and carbon dioxide from the air; they also react with carbon dioxide. This can be prevented by sealing the monoethanolamine under an inert gas. Smaller quantities of monoethanolamine should be stored in an airtight container, protected from light, in a cool, dry place.
9.35 Shipping
UN2491 Ethanol amine or Ethanolamine solutions, Hazard class: 8; Labels: 8-Corrosive material.
9.36 Incompatibilities
Monoethanolamine contains both a hydroxy group and a primary amine group and will thus undergo reactions characteristic of both alcohols and amines. Ethanolamines will react with acids to form salts and esters. Discoloration and precipitation will take place in the presence of salts of heavy metals. Monoethanolamine reacts with acids, acid anhydrides, acid chlorides, and esters to form amide derivatives, and with propylene carbonate or other cyclic carbonates to give the corresponding carbonates.
As a primary amine, monoethanolamine will react with aldehydes and ketones to yield aldimines and ketimines. Additionally, monoethanolamine will react with aluminum, copper, and copper alloys to form complex salts. A violent reaction will occur with acrolein, acrylonitrile, epichlorohydrin, propiolactone, and vinyl acetate.
9.37 Waste Disposal
Controlled incineration; incinerator equipped with a scrubber or thermal unit to reduce nitrogen oxides emissions
9.38 Regulatory Status
Included in parenteral and nonparenteral medicines licensed in the UK and USA. Included in the Canadian List of Acceptable Nonmedicinal Ingredients.
10. Computational chemical data
  • Molecular Weight:61.08308g/mol
  • Molecular Formula:C2H7NO
  • Compound Is Canonicalized:True
  • XLogP3-AA:
  • Exact Mass:61.052763847
  • Monoisotopic Mass:61.052763847
  • Complexity:10
  • Rotatable Bond Count:1
  • Hydrogen Bond Donor Count:2
  • Hydrogen Bond Acceptor Count:2
  • Topological Polar Surface Area:46.2
  • Heavy Atom Count:4
  • Defined Atom Stereocenter Count:0
  • Undefined Atom Stereocenter Count:0
  • Defined Bond Stereocenter Count:0
  • Undefined Bond Stereocenter Count:0
  • Isotope Atom Count:0
  • Covalently-Bonded Unit Count:1
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